In vitro Evaluation of Anticancer Activity of the Methanolic and Aqueous Extracts of the Petals of C. tinctorius L. (Safflower Florets)

Ayesha Sultana *

Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, Osmania University, Hyderabad, Government Medical College, Nalgonda, Telangana, India.

S. Y. Anwar

Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, Osmania University, Hyderabad, Government Medical College, Nalgonda, Telangana, India.

Md. Manazzir Hussain

Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, Osmania University, Hyderabad, Government Medical College, Nalgonda, Telangana, India.

B. Akhil Raj

Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, Osmania University, Hyderabad, Government Medical College, Nalgonda, Telangana, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

The anticancer activity of the methanolic and aqueous extracts of the petals of safflower florets  were analyzed using breast cancer cell lines namely  MCF-7. The, MCF-7 cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of the methanolic and aqueous extract of the petals  ranging from 5-150ug/ml  for different time periods (6, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, 72) and the cell viability was analyzed using MTT assay, aqueous extract of safflower florets Manjira and SSf-658 was found to be potent cytotoxic (IC50 value 34.17,36.96µg/ml) as similar to standard drug cisplatin. In addition to methanol extract pbns-12 was found to be potent cytotoxic with IC50 value 47.401±3.991 respectively.

Keywords: C. tinctorius florets, secondary metabolites, anticancer activity, cisplatin drug


How to Cite

Sultana , A., Anwar , S. Y., Hussain, M. M., & Raj, B. A. (2023). In vitro Evaluation of Anticancer Activity of the Methanolic and Aqueous Extracts of the Petals of C. tinctorius L. (Safflower Florets) . Asian Journal of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, 6(2), 82–86. Retrieved from https://journalajbge.com/index.php/AJBGE/article/view/102

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